Ark: Survival Evolved just got a big new update that added snow and swamp biomes. It’s awesome. Except for, well... one pretty big thing.

Players who had already settled down to live out the white picket fence/dodo army in the yard Arkmerican Dream are discovering that their bases are now, um, different. The new biomes were added to pre-existing locations on Ark’s map, but obviously bone-chilling tundras and sticky swamps are a far cry from the dinosaur survival game’s default tropical landscape. The Ark community’s been posting some pretty amusing before/after photos.

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Posting the above image, for instance, cruncha lamented, “Well... there used to be a base here.”

Then there’s Weebrett and co’s mountainside fortress, which looks like it got hit by an avalanche. And then a second avalanche, except made of dinosaurs.

Before:

After:

DaveRaptor’s base is now full of trees. I’m not talking houseplants, either. I mean that entire trees grew straight through his lovely home. Case in point:

I feel like kdma81 and friends are gonna have to get used to ducking from now on. Early onset neck and back issues ahoy:

Ammiam and friends’ base came out of the biomepocalypse looking pretty good!

Well, mostly.

And here’s socosoftware surveying the damages to his base after a swamp up and decided to live there. The short version? The soil erosion struggle is real.

On the upside, most players seem to be taking the post-patch weirdness in stride. The new biomes are pretty awesome, after all. Also, Ark is an Early Access game. There were bound to be some growing pains.

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Have you played Ark since the biome update? How’s your base looking? Is it a snow/frogball? Or did you luck out and escape the jarringly sudden ravages of nature relatively unscathed?

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